Screen Actors Guild Biography

Published On Oct 24, 2017
Facts of Screen Actors Guild
Date of Birth: 1933 , July-12
Birth Nation: United States
View moreless Facts of Screen Actors Guild

SAG was initially shunned by many high-profile actors. All this changed when producers and film studios made an agreement amongst themselves to not bid competitively for talent. A landmark meeting that took place at the residence of Frank Morgan (who played the title role in “The Wizard of Oz”) gave SAG its critical mass. After that, in a matter of three weeks, SAG’s membership went from the initial 80 members to more than 4,000.

Any performer was qualified to join the Screen Actors Guild by meeting the criteria in any of the following three categories: principal actor in a SAG production, background actor (originally the "three voucher rule"), and one-year member of an affiliated union (with a principal role). Membership benefits and privileges included standardized pay and work conditions, pension and health plans.

 Members joining the Los Angeles, New York, or Miami SAG branches were required to pay an initial fee $3,000. At the time of initiation, the first minimum semi-annual membership charge of $58 was to be paid, bringing the total amount due upon initiation into the Guild to $3,058.

The Guild has carried out numerous strikes throughout the period of its existence. The most infamous ones include the Emmy Awards boycott of 1980 and the commercials strike of 2000.In the former case, SAG members walked out on strike, along with AFTRA, the union for television and radio artists, and the American Federation of Musicians, calling for a boycott against that year's prime-time Emmy awards. The strike ended on October 25 after the Guild agreed to a 32.25% increase in minimum salaries and a 4.5% share of movies made for pay TV.

By 2012, SAG’s membership had expanded to 129,092 active members and 54,690 other members  (withdrawn/suspended).  On March 30, 2012, the SAG leadership announced that they had voted to merge with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) to create SAG-AFTRA (Screen Actors Guild-American Federation of Television and Radio Artists). The resulting organization is an American labor union representing approximately 160,000 film and television actors, journalists, radio personalities.               

 

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Screen Actors Guild

Screen Actors Guild facts on timeline

Birth of SAG

July 12 , 1933

The Screen Actors Guild was founded on July 12, 1933, in Hollywood, California, as a response to the exploitation of Hollywood actors by movie studios, notorious for their oppressive contract terms that did not include restrictions on work hours or minimum rest periods

Not to be Exploited

1980

The Guild has carried out numerous strikes throughout the period of its existence. One of the most infamous strikes involves the Emmy Awards boycott of 1980 when SAG members walked out on strike calling for a boycott against that year's prime-time Emmy awards. The strike ended on October 25 after the Guild agreed to a 32.25% increase in minimum salaries and a 4.5% share of movies made for pay TV.

Merger with AFTRA

March 30 , 2012

By 2012, SAG’s active membership had expanded to around a hundred and thirty thousand members.  On March 30, 2012, the SAG leadership announced that they had voted to merge with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) to create SAG-AFTRA.